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Journal of Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology

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Will Smith*
 
Department of Microbiology, University of Oxford, England, Email: [email protected]
 
*Correspondence: Will Smith, Department of Microbiology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Mar 06, 2021 / Accepted Date: Mar 20, 2021 / Published Date: Mar 27, 2021

Citation: Smith W. Women in their reproductive years who have uterine fibrosis. J Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2021;5(2):3.

This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes. For commercial reuse, contact [email protected]

Fibroids are benign tumors that develop from the smooth muscle tissue the uterus (myometrium) and grow in response to estrogen and progesterone. Fibroids are uncommon before puberty, but become more common during reproductive years and shrink in size after menopause. Endogenous development of estradiol is allowed by aromatase in fibroid tissue, and fibroid stem cells release estrogen and progesterone. Uterine fibroids [1] are widespread benign neoplasms that affect older women and people of African descent more frequently. In asymptomatic women, several are discovered by chance during a clinical exam or imaging. Fibroids can cause uterine bleeding, pelvic discomfort, bowel dysfunction, urinary frequency and urgency, urinary retention, low back pain, constipation, and dyspareunia, among other symptoms. Ultrasonography is a technique that uses sound waves to determine the presence.

The size and position of fibroids, as well as the patient's age, symptoms, ability to preserve fertility, and access to care, should all be considered, as should the physician's experience. Hormonal contraception, tranexamic acid, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications are among the medical treatments for excessive menstrual bleeding. Selective progesterone agonists or gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists. The most common benign tumors in women of reproductive age are uterine fibroids, also known as leiomyoma’s. Their frequency varies with age; by the age of 50, they can be found in up to 80% of women. Fibroids are the most common reason for hysterectomy, accounting for 39% of all hysterectomies performed in the US each year. While several are discovered by chance on imaging in asymptomatic patients, about 20% and 50% of women have symptoms and may want to seek treatment.

Clinical Characteristics

Subserosal (projecting beyond the uterus), intramural (within the myometrium), and sub mucosal (within the mucosa) are the three types of uterine fibroids (projecting into the uterine cavity). The size, number, and location of the tumors influences the symptoms and treatment options. Abnormal uterine bleeding, typically prolonged menstrual bleeding is the most common symptom. Pelvic discomfort, bowel dysfunction, urinary frequency and urgency, urinary retention, low back pain, constipation, and dyspareunia are among the other symptoms. Women with fibroids have a higher risk of postpartum haemorrhage [2], due to an elevated risk of uterine atony in the postpartum period. The risk of cancer from uterine fibroids is extremely low; leiomyosarcoma is estimated to affect around one in every 400 (0.25 percent) women who have fibroids removed. Fibroids expand and shrink naturally, so enlarging them can be risky.

Progenesis

Fibroids are diagnosed primarily based on the patient's presenting symptoms, such as unexplained menstrual bleeding, bulk symptoms, pelvic pain, or anaemia-related findings. Fibroids are sometimes discovered in asymptomatic women during regular pelvic examinations or imaging. Ultrasonography [3] is the chosen first imaging modality for fibroids in the United States. Fibroids are sometimes discovered in asymptomatic women during regular pelvic examinations or imaging. Ultrasonography is the chosen first imaging modality for fibroids in the United States. Transvaginal ultrasonography can detect uterine fibroids with a sensitivity of 90 to 99 percent, but it can miss subserosal or small fibroids. Adding sonohysterography or hysteroscopy to the mix is risky.

References

1.De La Cruz MSD and Buchanan EM. Uterine Fibroids: Diagnosis and Treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2017;95(2):100-107.

2.Watkins EJ and Stem K. Postpartum hemorrhage. Official Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants. 2020;33(4):29-33.

3.Maller VV, Cohen HL. Neonatal Head Ultrasound: A Review and Update-Part 1: Techniques and Evaluation of the Premature Neonate. Ultrasound Q. 2019;35(3):202-211.

 

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