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Journal of Blood Disorders and Treatment

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Varshini Boga*
 
Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, India, Email: [email protected]
 
*Correspondence: Varshini Boga, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, India, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Jul 05, 2021 / Accepted Date: Jul 17, 2021 / Published Date: Jul 24, 2021

Citation: Boga V. A review note on Covid-19 is more common in people with sickle cell disease, thus it's important to know what causes it and how to avoid it. J Blood Disord Treat. 2021; 4(4):4.

This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes. For commercial reuse, contact [email protected]

Abstract

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary disease that affects millions of people around the world. Living with this condition during COVID-19 is difficult, and extra care are required. Due to their immunocompromised state, people with sickle cell illness are particularly susceptible to COVID19

Introduction

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary disease that affects millions of people around the world. Living with this condition during COVID-19 is difficult, and extra care are required. Due to their immunocompromised state, people with sickle cell illness are particularly susceptible to COVID19.

During the pandemic, people must be cautious and observe protocols such as masking, social distance, and handwashing, among others. A little foresight, knowledge, and day-to-day management can help to mitigate the danger.

What is sickle cell disease?

The typically flexible red blood cells (RBCs) in sickle cell disease become hard and sticky, forming a sickle or crescent shape. The sickle-shaped RBCs form clumps and adhere to the inside walls of blood vessels. This reduces blood flow and oxygen to various bodily areas or organs, resulting in organ damage or even stroke.

A mutation in a gene that controls RBC production causes the condition. Sickle cells contain a kind of haemoglobin that causes the sickling appearance. Anemia, discomfort, delayed growth, eye issues, low immunity, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and other consequences can occur in people with SCD.

Understanding the triggers

Certain diseases might either cause or aggravate the pain associated with SCD. Extreme temperatures, a shortage of oxygen at high altitudes, and other factors contribute to this. Alcohol and smoking must be avoided by anyone who have this illness. This is due to the fact that both of these behaviours can lead to dehydration and the development of a lung ailment known as acute chest syndrome.

Pain management

SCD patients must learn to manage their pain. Patients with the illness should have seen their doctor on a regular basis to learn how to manage their pain. This could be accomplished by medicine or other forms of treatment.

Role of caregivers

Caregivers have a critical role in the care of SCD patients. They can aid in the understanding of crisis circumstances, serve as a vital support system for the family, and be aware of triggers. They can also assist with pain management using a variety of approaches and refer you to medical professionals if things get out of hand.

While SCD can have a negative influence on a person's physical and mental health, having a management and support system at home can help. Medical assistance and drug scheduling can be handled by a variety of home healthcare companies. This is especially essential because persons with SCD are more susceptible to infections like the COVID-19. The pain that comes with SCD varies from person to person.

Managing the symptoms

Since it is a chronic condition, with good management, people can live a full life and continue to do most of their everyday activities. The majority of therapy approaches for this disorder are symptomatic, with the goal of reducing pain and other negative effects. Maintain a healthy lifestyle that includes a balanced and nutritious diet, appropriate sleep, hydration, and frequent physical activity.

• If you smoke, try to quit as soon as possible.

• Avoid situations that could trigger a crisis, such as exposure to severe temperatures, by drinking alcohol in moderation.

• Do not travel in an unpressurized aircraft cabin.

• Make sure you take your medications on time. Follow your doctor's orders for medical and lab tests, as well as vaccines.

References

1. Driscoll MC, Hurlet A, Styles L, et al. Stroke risk in siblings with sickle cell anemia. Blood. 2003;101:2401–2404.

2. Quinn CT, Rogers ZR, Buchanan GR. Survival of children with sickle cell disease. Blood. 2004;103:4023–4027.

3. Adams R.J, Kutlar A, McKie V,et al.Alpha thalassemia and stroke risk in sickle cell anemia.Am J Hematol. 1994; 45: 279.

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