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Journal of Nursing Research and Practice

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Bente Abrahamsen1* and Aagoth E. L. Storvik2
 
1 Centre for the Studies of Professions, Oslo Metropolitan University, Pb.4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130, Oslo, Norway, Email: [email protected]
2 School of Business, Oslo Metropolitan University, Pb.4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130, Oslo, Norway
 
*Correspondence: Bente Abrahamsen, Centre for the Studies of Professions, Oslo Metropolitan University, Pb.4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130, Oslo, Norway, Tel: +47 93035106, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Mar 19, 2019 / Accepted Date: Apr 08, 2019 / Published Date: Apr 16, 2019

Citation: Abrahamsen B, Storvik AEL. Nursing students’ career expectations: Gender differences and supply side explanations. J Nurs Res Pract. 2019;3(1):16-20

This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes. For commercial reuse, contact [email protected]

Abstract

This article investigates the gender differences in nursing students’ expectations of hierarchical careers. Due to the relative weak representation of female nurses in management and senior nursing positions, it is important to understand how supply side mechanisms produce gender differences in nurses’ career progressions. A quantitative study of 360 undergraduate nursing students was carried out. The questionnaire was distributed in 2015 to all undergraduate nursing students in their final study semester at three universities in Norway (N=360). Data were analysed by linear regression analyses (OLS). The findings show that female nursing students have lower expectations of attaining a management position compared to their male peers, but equal expectations of achieving a master’s degree. This gender difference still pertains, even when controlling for ambitions, family situation and self-assertiveness. The results support the assumption of perceived gender discrimination as a relevant explanation for gender differences in career expectations. To convince female nurses to apply for management positions as often as male nurses do, the health sector has to improve their recruitment practices and hiring processes.

 
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