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Journal of Nursing Research and Practice

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Beckham Jonathan*
 
Managing Editor, Journal of Petroleum and Environmental Biotechnology, United Kingdom, Email: [email protected]
 
*Correspondence: Beckham Jonathan, Managing Editor, Journal of Petroleum and Environmental Biotechnology, United Kingdom, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Sep 15, 2021 / Accepted Date: Sep 20, 2021 / Published Date: Sep 25, 2021

Citation: Beckham Jonathan. Police violence and unjust policing in healthcare. J Nurs Prac 2021; 5:9

This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes. For commercial reuse, contact [email protected]

Editorial

Policing is a public health and wellness issue since it’s a device of racist and discriminatory power frameworks, proactively hurting the physical, psychological, social and psychological health and wellness and wellness of populaces, especially Black and people of colour, and various other minoritised populaces. Policing refers public health and wellness since criminalisation and vindictive reactions to social issues recreate the social and financial problems that lead to criminalized behaviors, weakening healthy and balanced neighborhoods. An essential tenet of abolitionist public health and wellness is establishing and executing treatments that deal with the social, social, financial and political factors of health and wellness at the origin of social issues, therefore production policing outdated.

Defunding the authorities and reallocating public funds to main and second preventative plans lined up with the social decision of health and wellness are important actions to abolition. We require the assistance and development of option systems that centre cumulative treatment and wellness, and a nonviolent public health and wellness rooted in transformative justice. Through harassment, sexual abuse, and as a source of poor physical and mental health, state violence perpetrated by the police and incarceration systems directly impacts health. Indirectly, police reproduces the social and economic conditions that are presented as grounds for increased policing. This loop is dangerous to one’s health. There many recorded digital reports in between policing and healthrelated results, consisting of however not restricted to: deadly injuries that enhance population-specific death rates; unfavorable physical reactions that enhance morbidity; mental stress; arrests, incarcerations, and lawful, clinical, and funeral service expenses that trigger socioeconomic deprivation; bad institution performance; insufficient high-school diplomas; arrests, incarcerations, and lawful, clinical, and funeral service expenses that trigger socioeconomic deprivation; bad institution performance; insufficient highschool.

Punitive and carceral approaches to crime do not fulfil the needs of disadvantaged populations, nor do they aim to address the root causes of crime, such as social, economic, and political difficulties. Even if some police agencies managed to address these upstream issues, the PIC as a whole would continue to damage people and reproduce the societal conditions that lead to criminal behaviour. The carceral state, increasingly militarized policing, and the conveyor belt of privately owned mega-prisons created simply for profit do not rehabilitate so-called offenders, give transformational justice to communities, or decrease crime, as reoffending rates alone demonstrate. Apart from the institution, policing occurs in a variety of settings. The approach to people experiencing mental health crises in healthcare is dominated by policing.

Disruption in educational environments is treated harshly, with Black pupils being more likely to be expelled permanently. Attempts have been made to ban critical race theory from public discourse by the state. Not only is police a racist institution, but it also perpetuates racism and other repressive inequalities in a variety of circumstances. We must expose mechanisms that criminalise, penalize and disrupt communities, limit possibilities, perpetrate violence, and invisibilize people rather than serve their needs, both within and outside of healthcare. As a result, the case for abolition becomes clearer.

 
Google scholar citation report
Citations : 60

Journal of Nursing Research and Practice received 60 citations as per google scholar report

Journal of Nursing Research and Practice peer review process verified at publons

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